The website is a platform which shows possibilities of linking the history education with human rights education and vice versa for NGOs' activists, other activists, librarians, teachers, scientists, everyone, who is interested in history and human rights issues.

Which actions do we propose? 1. Writing of articles about connecting of history education with human rights education (an inspiration can be the article of Monique Eckmann, Exploring the relevance of teaching and learning about the Holocaust for human rights education, our suggestions you can find here). 2. Preparing of materials inspired by or related to the textbook "History and human rights", e.g. comments to self chosen historical sources from the human rights' point of view, workshops' scenarios. 3. Sending us descriptions of implemention of project on the base of our textbook "History and human rights" in the local environment. 4. Sending us descriptions of implemention of your project, based on the connection of history education and human rights education (look at our suggestions). Send us your ideas, comments or concepts and if they refer to our suggestions, we publish them on the Website.

In the rubric Contacts we add contact possibilities to the autors of the texts to build a network of scientists and other educators to deepen the connection of human rights and history. You can contact us via e-mail: prawa.czlowieka@karta.org.pl or phone: 0048 22 844 10 55.

Projects
The learning module wants pupils to discuss what rights are and why children need rights. After looking back at disenfranchisement in history, it shows pupils the importance of saving rights today. It asks them how a declaration should look like and what the pupils can do for keeping children’s/human rights alive. By the historical example of Jewish children during National Socialism the learning module shows how disenfranchisement could have happened and therefore makes obvious, that it is important to save children’s rights.

In the learning module, the concept of “learning for Human Rights”, or in this case “Children’s Rights” is brought into focus. The students get to know the Geneva Declaration of the Rights of a Child and the UNCRC. As Eckmann states in her article, it is difficult to learn how to prevent the violation of human rights within Holocaust Education, but the author hopes this learning module will lead towards an attitude of taking actions against the violations of children’s rights. Therefore it is also necessary to teach “within Human Rights”, so the learning module combines the visit of a memorial, active methods and group work.

The Learning Module cosist of 3 interactive lessons about the history of DP camps and a guided tour to memorial place and exhibition of Museum in Bergen-Belsen conected to discussions on feelings after visit of memorial place and topics related to the question of history of DP camps which are prepared by the students in advance. 

History of childhood in Stalin’s times and history of children’s rights are equally important for this educational module and allow to see the process of recognition of children as an object of protection against abuse, as a historical subject. History of childhood is interesting and emotionally appealing for young people. It is a great framework for them to see a historical epoch through the eyes of his or her peers and understand that childhood is an inherently valued period of life – not just preparation for adulthood. 

Learning module has been reflected for implementation during social studies lessons (lessons in Russian schools that include basics of economy, political sciences, philosophy and law) after aforesaid historical topic was studied. Therefore there is an opportunity to provide students with one more view or tool of analysis of historical and political processes often being omitted at history classes – human rights and their abusement. Such a connection may be given according to Michael Mann’s concept of classification of political regimes linking human rights and citizenship. 

The connection to human rights is in regards to the development of children’s rights in general. School students learn about their own rights through the understanding of how these rights were evolved during the time. Facilitator should keep in mind that school students should first of all reflect upon their personal rights in contemporary times.

The book represents one of the outcomes of an international project that analysed the injustice committed by the Nazi regime towards certain groups of vulnerable people, and explored how to carry such experience into human rights education today. The project fits into the wider context of the promotion of human rights in Central Europe through critical examination of history, under the auspices of German foundation „Erinnerung, Verantwortung und Zukunft“ (Remembrance, Responsibility and Future).

Simulation games are an innovative educational tool linking human rights education with political and history education. Simulating human rights dilemmas provides a playful way of learning and understanding the complex political dynamics behind them. Participants assume the roles of different interest groups, explore the driving forces and the historical background of a conflict, explore codified rights related to the case, and strive for an acceptable compromise in negotiations.

Educating people about historical issues can be a daunting task since many feel that things which happened in the past do not possess a lot of meaning for their everyday lives. However, the Amadeu Antonio Foundation believes that history education is absolutely necessary to achieve meaningful social and political changes and to hinder atrocities such as the Holocaust from ever being carried out again. As Theodor W. Adorno has written, “the premier demand upon all education is that Auschwitz shall never happen again”.

The Learning Module (LM) was prepared during the Transnational Training Programme in Oświęcim, Bergen Belsen and Russian Perm. The author wanted to interlink the following in the Module: role of history, memorial sites and children rights. The LM should be implemented at the Auschwitz Birkenau Museum not only due to the fact that it is near the place of work of the MIFGASH Foundation (Cracow), but also on account of its uniqueness and educational possibilities. Auschwitz, as most memorial sites, focuses mainly at providing historical knowledge. Such a mission belongs to the tasks of qualified tour guides which are fulfilled by them professionally. The author of the LM had decided that the project would exploit their knowledge in combination with education within children rights. The final version of the LM can be downloaded here.

News
19.09.2016 | Monday
EUROPEANS FOR PEACE - the funding programme for international school and youth projects - announces this years' call for application on the subject „Discrimination: Watch Out!”.
22.06.2016 | Wednesday
Since its establishment in 2008, the Human Rights Tulip has been awarded to individuals and organisations from a variety of countries. The Human Rights Tulip is an award of the Dutch government, organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, for courageous human rights defenders who promote and support human rights in innovative ways.
21.10.2015 | Wednesday
The University College Roosevelt (UCR) and Human Rights Education Associates (HREA) organised the Sixth International Human Rights Education Conference will be hosted in Middelburg, the Netherlands.
10.09.2015 | Thursday
In its EUROPEANS FOR PEACE programme, the Foundation EVZ promotes international school and youth projects between Germany, the countries of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe as well as Israel. In these projects young people actively explore the subjects of discrimination and persecution under National Socialism and/or present-day discrimination issues.
09.04.2015 | Thursday
The application deadline is the 25th of April 2015. The application form can be viewed here.
Materials
04.08.2014 | Monday
Are you looking for inspiration for your workshop about human rights and minorities? Are you interested on one of the topics: Jan Karski, Irena Sendler, refugees/migrants, Roma minority, autism in Poland: contemporary hurdles and a haunted past, rights of LGBTQ persons, rights of persons with a different national/ethnic background: the case of Jews. Download this toolkit. The publication was conducted within a framework of the "Humanity in Action Poland's Fellowship 2013: Poland in Theory and Practice: from Resistance to S/solidarity, from Transformation to Civic Society."
30.07.2014 | Wednesday
ContentsForewordFrom the editorsI. Human Rights – a historical and contemporary perspective, Radosław MilczarskiII. Education and human rights, Monika Mazur-Rafał, Magdalena SzarotaIII. Workshop scenariosIII. 1. State interference and control, Monika LipkaIII. 2. Minority-Majority relationships, Monika Mazur-Rafał, Magdalena SzarotaIII. 3. Social rights, Monika LipkaIII. 4. The rights of accused and convicted persons, Monika LipkaIII. 5. Freedom of speech, Monika Mazur-Rafał, Magdalena SzarotaIV. Interpretation of visual sources, Jerzy Kochanowski, Katarzyna CzajkaShort biographies of the authorsCONTACT:Fundacja Ośrodka KARTA, ul. Narbutta 29, 02-536 Warszawa, tel.: (+48 22) 844 10 55, e-mail: prawa.czlowieka@karta.org.pl
30.07.2014 | Wednesday
The aim of this part of textbook is to push recipients of the educational section to self interpretation of iconographic sources. So we present photos and comments separately. You can find there a proposal of a workshop. The sources are divided thematic: a) state interference and control – no 5, 10, 12, 13, 23, 27, b) relations between Minorities and Majorities – no 1, 2, 6, 11, 15, 29, c) social rights – no 7, 14, 16, 17, 20, 30, d) rights of accused and of convicted persons – number 3, 8, 9, 21, 24, 26, e) freedom of speech – number  4, 18, 19, 22, 25, 28. Most of the rights mentioned in interpretative texts were only codified after the events shown in the illustrations. The regulation of rights was, therefore, a kind of reaction to events and the rights were made law in order to ensure that similar events do not occur in the future. 
18.07.2014 | Friday
Suggestions of combining historical education with education for human rights are a result of the project "Local Library as a place of human rights education: a textbook for educators and training". The project was implemented within the TEACHING HUMAN RIGHTS programme with support from the Foundation “Remembrance, Responsibility and Future”.
"Welcome to the first edition of the LfH Magazine in the new year. We’re focusing on "discrimination in the past and the present" in international project work."
In Czechoslovakia, as in many other Central European countries, the introduction of the Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses, or GzVeN) was largely the concern of medical and legal experts. Although as late as Autumn 1932 the authorities observed that "… we are not aware of the question of sterilization having been considered by the Czechoslovak Parliament, nor of it having been the subject of administrative investigations." A few months after the introduction of GzVeN, however, the view that it would "be… prudent to pay greater attention to these issues" had already begun to appear in professional medical publications. 
The commemoration of the crimes committed on Roma and Sinti (in the following part shortly referred to as Roma) is for the Roma society an extremely important issue.  It is essential not only because of its human aspect, not only because of the inner need to cultivate the memory about the murder that took place but also because of the nation-building character of this public history of the Roma. The memory about the Nazi crimes is an important element integrating a society scattered over many different countries, diverse in terms of culture and dialectics and therefore constitutes a critical factor influencing formation of the common national identity of the Roma. In this context it is essential to pose a question - what is the current state of the commemoration of the crimes committed against Roma?
The commemoration of the crimes committed on Roma and Sinti (in the following part shortly referred to as Roma) is for the Roma society an extremely important issue.  It is essential not only because of its human aspect, not only because of the inner need to cultivate the memory about the murder that took place but also because of the nation-building character of this public history of the Roma. The memory about the Nazi crimes is an important element integrating a society scattered over many different countries, diverse in terms of culture and dialectics and therefore constitutes a critical factor influencing formation of the common national identity of the Roma. In this context it is essential to pose a question - what is the current state of the commemoration of the crimes committed against Roma?